Monthly Archives: November 2014

A Meta-Analysis of the Impacts of Genetically Modified Crops

MON810 confined field trial in Kiboko, Kenya

MON810 confined field trial in Kiboko, Kenya

On average, GM technology adoption has reduced chemical pesticide use by 37%, increased  crop yields by 22%, and increased farmer profits by 68%. Yield gains and pesticide reductions are larger for insect-resistant crops than for herbicide-tolerant crops. Yield and profit gains are higher in developing countries than in developed countries.

Summary result of a meta-analysis carried out on impacts of genetically modified crops

A Meta-Analysis of the Impacts of Genetically Modified

http://www.economist.com/news/science-and-technology/21630961-biggest-study-so-far-finds-gm-crops-have-large-widespread-benefits-field 

 

 

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Position statement on new crop breeding tools published by UK’s major plant science funder

In order for farmers, both in the EU and globally, to provide a sustainable food supply we will need to develop crop varieties with improved characteristics, such as drought tolerance, disease resistance or enhanced nutrient content. To do this we must take advantage of the wide range of techniques available in order to use the right approach for the right circumstance, such as conventional breeding, genetic modification or newer methods like genome editing. BBSRC Chief Executive, Professor Jackie Hunter

The Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) has published a position statement on new and emerging techniques for crop improvement. These novel techniques, which can introduce precise genetic changes into plants, are currently being used in research labs as a tool to help understand the function of genes. Commercial applications are likely to follow: new and improved crop varieties produced with these methods could be available world-wide over the coming years.

More on this story: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/policy/2014/141028-pr-position-statement-on-crop-breeding-techniques.aspx

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Norway allows import of genetically-modified maize for food

OSLO, Oct. 29 (Xinhua) — In a big shift from the position held by the previous government, the current Norwegian government will open the door for genetically-modified maize to be imported for food, the Norwegian news agency NTB reported on Wednesday.  http://www.shanghaidaily.com/article/article_xinhua.aspx?id=249675  

 

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Patrick holds the large ear of the DroughtTEGO™ maize hybrid

Giving hope a chance: Farmer stories on the DroughtTEGO™ hybrid

With over 20 years’ experience in farming, it was a pleasure to hear Patrick Magana Londi, a farmer from Holo, Kisumu County say “I am confident in the TEGO”. Patrick was referring to the WE1101 hybrid.

Patrick holds the large ear of the DroughtTEGO™ maize hybrid

Patrick holds the large ear of the DroughtTEGO™ maize hybrid

Being a seasoned farmer, and one who does farming as a business, Patrick says he practices due diligence before adopting new technologies as this is where his income comes from. This was his third harvest of the DroughtTEGO™ hybrid and he reckons he has made a good decision in adopting the hybrid. “I follow up on new seeds so that I can plant the latest technologies as our area here is so dry and usually we don’t get good harvests if we don’t go for good seeds. For this season (Long rains) we haven’t had any (variety) which did better than this one (TEGO)”, he says.

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